Searchshow menu

Engagement and Learning

loading the player ...
Transcript of Engagement and Learning video
"It is not the years in your life, but the
life in your years that counts" Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

The challenge

Learning is a lifelong process and an important part of successful ageing, particularly within the workplace. Learning and training allows older workers to continually adapt to changing demands in the workplace, as well as satisfying personal and social purposes. Employers need to recognise the skills of older workers and encourage further skill development. Investment in appropriate learning and development opportunities, regardless of age, bring direct benefits to business by building resilience to adapt to changing demands in the workplace.

When people construct their own career paths, work in areas that use their potential and meet their own goals, they are likely to be more motivated and more productive.

The opportunity

Investing in learning and development for older workers brings benefits to both employers and workers. Older workers need training throughout their careers to keep their skills up-to-date and relevant for the needs of the organisation. They are likely to be more engaged, satisfied in their jobs, and more productive.

As older workers frequently remain with their employer for a longer period compared to younger workers, employers are likely to reap a higher return on their learning and development investment in older workers. To do this, organisations need to:

  • understand the business needs
  • offer learning and development opportunities to all workers, regardless of age
  • raise awareness of barriers and enablers of older workers to access learning and development opportunities
  • strengthen performance management processes and practices and make sure they are applied to older workers
  • monitor the uptake of learning and development opportunities by older workers.

To take action, download the Engagement and Learning guidance.

Engagement and Learning Video Resources

Additional information

Last updated: 18 Sep 2014